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Journal

Linen = Longevity

Linen = Longevity

Have you browsed our kitchen linen collection? Using these 100% Japanese linen towels regularly has spoiled us rotten, as the vibrant color spruces up our kitchens and the hand feel is luxurious, plus quick drying.

Linen is known to be the world’s strongest natural fiber. It is thicker than cotton and linen fiber has variable lengths, most of which are very long. This contributes to strength, which contributes to longevity. Linen lasts a very long time.

The method of producing linen fabric from flax plants uses far less water than it does to produce the same amount of cotton. This makes it a more sustainable choice. Fewer pesticides are used to grow flax than in cotton growing, and linen can be processed without the use of chemicals.

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The Difference

The Difference

Are you wondering what makes our tees different than the ones you see at Target and H&M? I’m Jenny Hwathe founder of Loyale and I’m here to share what sets us apart:

  • Virtuous workmanship, timeless design, superior fabrics and giving back are our founding ideologies.
  • There is a disconnect between people coveting locavore and artisanal fare, while having considerably less conviction about where the items in their wardrobe originated and who crafted them. Apparel companies have been lethargic with transparency, so we’re looking to apply the same principles the slow food community has embraced.
  • We take “Made in the U.S.A.” to the next level by offering detailed information about what goes into making a Loyale garment. We source the best quality materials from sustainably run Japanese mills for our classic silhouettes and they’re ethically cut and sewn at a worker-owned cooperative in North Carolina.
  • We design classic wardrobe staples that you’ll reach for on a daily basis, in an attempt to be a relaxing wardrobe choice that eliminates decision fatigue. It’s our philosophy that an easy to assemble wardrobe allows you to spend less time getting dressed and more time pursuing worthwhile endeavors. 
  • Taking our socially responsible objectives a step further, we spotlight 501c3s and $2 from each garment sold is donated to nonprofits making a positive impact. 

The power is in our hands; each of us can change the fashion industry by shopping less and when we do, let’s support ethical fashion purveyors. We can also begin asking our favorite brands - who is making your clothes, what are you doing with your fabric waste (our scraps are recycled!) and how are you contributing to make the world a better place?

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What is Fashion Revolution Week?

What is Fashion Revolution Week?

Five years ago, the issue of where our clothes come from went from being a matter of curiosity to something more urgent. It was on April 24, 2013 that the Rana Plaza disaster occurred on the outskirts of Dhaka in Bangladesh; more than 1,130 people died after the factory building in which they were working collapsed. The disaster galvanised Carry Somers and Orsola de Castro, co-founders of Fashion Revolution, into action. Fast-forward to now and it has grown into the world’s largest global fashion activism movement.

Their campaign is simple. They are urging the industry to take more responsibility and show greater transparency in the supply chain. If brands do not know what is happening in the factories that supply them, if is difficult for them to improve conditions. Fashion Revolution asks one question: who made my clothes? By holding our favourite brands to account, it is possible to create change that minimises the risk of such a disaster recurring.

From The Guardian

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52 Fashion Seasons vs. 4 = Waste

52 Fashion Seasons vs. 4 = Waste

Americans now dispose of about 12.8 million tons of textiles annually - 80 lbs. for each man, woman and child. Why? Fast fashion.

Retailers like Zara, Target, H&M, Walmart and Forever 21 expedite the design development process to get more clothing in the hands of consumers quicker and at a very low price. It results in close to 52 fashion “seasons” per year instead of 4.

In order to meet such high demand, something must be sacrificed and unfortunately, that sacrifice is often related to the quality of the garment, its effect on the environment, and the human lives involved in the production process.

Fashion should not come at the cost of degrading the environment and human life. We’re encouraging everyone to recognize, the power is in our hands and we can make a difference simply by putting thought and compassion into what we buy.

We develop seasonless collections with classic designs that can be worn anytime of year, plus all of our styles are ethically crafted with the best, made to last materials, so you can look good and shop responsibly.

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Ethics | Is 20 Cents an Hour Fair?

Ethics | Is 20 Cents an Hour Fair?

Running a company with ethical practices isn't easy, but it's the right thing to do. Did you know the average garment worker in Bangladesh earns about $0.20/hour and Chinese workers make around $2/hour. First world shopping habits shouldn't stand in the way of fellow humans being able to secure food, shelter, clothing, health care, transportation and other necessities of living in modern society. April is an important awareness month, we'll be celebrating Earth Day on April 22nd and Fashion Revolution Week From April 23rd to 29th. We're kicking the month off with a picture of Eulusia, our talented sewer at Opportunity Threads, crafting one of our tees because for us it's essential to know #whomademyclothes. She makes a living wage and is one of the owners of the worker-owed factory we collaborate with. Take a peek in your closet and consider the origin story of each piece, do you know who made your clothes and in what conditions? Food for thought...

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